Alz.org / Alzheimers disease



Domain overview in Alzheimers Disease niche. Based on relevant links and pages only.
alz.org rank
3
Number of domains linking to alz.org
190
semantic flow
53.54
Number of links to alz.org
803
semantic flow
53.54
Number of domains linked from alz.org
73
semantic flow
10.96
Number of links from alz.org
146
semantic flow
10.96

Popular pages pointing to alz.org

Pages with highest topical PageRank pointing to domain.

url / atext / target url
https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/04/05/ask-well-how-do-you-die-from-alzheimers/
alzheimer s association
http://www.alz.org/
well.blogs.nytimes.com
https://memory.ucsf.edu/dementia-overview
alzheimer s association
http://www.alz.org/
memory.ucsf.edu
https://www.alzheimers.net/2013-06-26/national-alzheimers-plan-updat/
alzheimer s association international conference
https://www.alz.org/research/funding/alzheimers_conference.asp
www.alzheimers.net
https://www.nccdp.org/ddmenu-source.html
world alzheimer s day september 21
https://www.alz.org/ri/in_my_community_22380.asp
www.nccdp.org
https://www.alz.co.uk/other-languages
alzheimer s association usa
http://www.alz.org/asian/overview.asp?nL=VI&dL=VI
www.alz.co.uk
http://www.health.com/news/2-10-alzheimers-cases-may-be-misdiagnosed
alzheimer s association
http://m.alz.org/
www.health.com
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/2140529.stm
8th international alzheimer s conference
http://www.alz.org/AboutUs/WhatWeDo/IRC.htm
news.bbc.co.uk
https://www.alz.co.uk/other-languages
alzheimer s association usa
https://www.alz.org/asian/overview.asp?nL=ZH&dL=ZH
www.alz.co.uk
https://www.alz.co.uk/other-languages
alzheimer s association usa
http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_languages.asp
www.alz.co.uk
https://www.alz.co.uk/other-languages
alzheimer s association usa
http://www.alz.org/asian/overview.asp?nL=KO&dL=KO
www.alz.co.uk

Popular pages from alz.org

On-topic pages from domain with highest topical PageRank.

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Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia | Alzheimer's Association
https://alz.org/
0.33151281144
Clinical Criteria for Alzheimer's Diagnosis | Research Center | Alzheimer's Association
https://www.alz.org/research/diagnostic_criteria/
0.312896211
Alzheimer's Policy and Advocacy | Alzheimer's Association
https://www.alz.org/research/funding/alzheimers_policy_and_advocacy.asp
0.2914060011
10 Ways to Love Your Brain | Alzheimeru2019s Association
https://www.alz.org/brain-health/10_ways-to-love-your-brain.asp
0.29136240022
Parkinson's Disease Dementia | Signs, Symptoms, & Diagnosis
https://www.alz.org/dementia/parkinsons-disease-symptoms.asp
0.28175541122
Early-Stage Advisory Group | Alzheimer's Association
https://alz.org/about_us_early_stage_advisory_group.asp
0.28146160000
Your Dollars at Work | Walk to End Alzheimer's
https://act.alz.org/site/SPageServer/PageServer?pagename=walk_money
0.2812972200
Alzheimer's Association | Alzheimer's Association
http://act.alz.org/site/PageServer
0.28162220011
Videos and Media
https://www.alz.org/research/video/alzheimers_videos_and_media_inside.asp
0.2812630000
Take the Purple Pledge | My Brain™ Movement | Alzheimer's Association
https://mybrain.alz.org/
0.2811140011

Domains with most semantic flow to alz.org

Relevant domains with most links to selected domain.

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count


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semantic flow


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http://dementiatoday.com/ 634.41dementiatoday.com
http://verywell.com/ 443.17verywell.com
http://medicalnewstoday.com/ 372.66medicalnewstoday.com
http://medlineplus.gov/ 342.37medlineplus.gov
http://alznorcalblog.org/ 272.33alznorcalblog.org
http://alztex.org/ 292.32alztex.org
http://alzheimers.net/ 211.85alzheimers.net
http://healthline.com/ 261.84healthline.com
http://everydayhealth.com/ 161.24everydayhealth.com
http://cnn.com/ 181.23cnn.com

Domains with most semantic flow from alz.org

Relevant domains with most links from selected domain.

domain info
count


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semantic flow


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http://nih.gov/ 211.69nih.gov
http://alzheimersanddementia.com/ 100.81alzheimersanddementia.com
http://nihseniorhealth.gov/ 80.74nihseniorhealth.gov
http://oup.com/ 110.61oup.com
http://alzforum.org/ 50.4alzforum.org
http://alzheimersnavigator.org/ 50.35alzheimersnavigator.org
http://alzconnected.org/ 50.33alzconnected.org
http://alztex.org/ 30.26alztex.org
http://washingtonpost.com/ 30.24washingtonpost.com
http://who.int/ 30.22who.int

Most linked pages from alz.org

Pages from domain with most relevant inbound links.

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http://www.alz.org/ 140.2910.16-1--1-1-1-11213
https://www.alz.org/contact_us_contact_us.asp 90.20.990.351yes37150000
https://www.alz.org/ 90.2110.331yes49271111
https://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_10_signs_of_alzheimers.asp 40.170.990.251yes64352211
http://alz.org/documents_custom/world_dementia_council_release_121417.pdf 20.160.960.1-1--1-1-1-100
http://alz.org/documents_custom/RAISE_passage_press_release_012218.pdf 20.160.970.1-1--1-1-1-100
https://www.alz.org/documents_custom/senate_subcommittee_joint_statement_090617.pdf 20.160.960.1-1--1-1-1-100
http://alz.org/documents_custom/graham_cassidy_joint_statement_092017.pdf 20.160.950.1-1--1-1-1-100
http://alz.org/documents_custom/BOLD_infrastructure_for_alzheimers_act_press_release_11061 20.160.960.1-1--1-1-1-100
http://shop.alz.org/Special-Promotions/Fashion-Sunglasses 20.160.950.1-1--1-1-1-100

Hubs from alz.org

Pages from domain with most likely on-topic outgoing links.

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https://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_what_is_alzheimers.asp 310.1812.481yes67412200
https://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_10_signs_of_alzheimers.asp 270.170.992.071yes64352211
https://www.alz.org/ 260.2112.461yes49271111
https://www.alz.org/about_us_about_us_.asp 160.20.991.591yes71394400
https://www.alz.org/care/overview.asp 60.1710.341yes105322100
https://www.alz.org/contact_us_contact_us.asp 30.20.990.291yes37150000
https://www.alz.org/research/science/alzheimers_treatment_horizon.asp 20.180.950.161yes3081111
https://www.alz.org/research/clinical_trials/find_clinical_trials_trialmatch.asp 20.170.990.151yes2630011
https://www.alz.org/apps/jobs/JobSearch.asp 10.180.990.091yes27161100
https://www.alz.org/research/alzheimers_grants/overview.asp 10.160.990.061yes3751100

Random 'alzheimers disease FAQs', may be related to more specific topics, not general alzheimers disease topic.

ALZHEIMERS DISEASE FAQs

END-STAGE KIDNEY DISEASE AND ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE/DEMENTIA?.

Q: What is Alzheimer’s Disease?
A: Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative condition that affects a person’s memory and other cognitive functions, making it difficult to perform daily tasks and activities.
Q: What is the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia?
A: Dementia is a clinical syndrome of progressive cognitive impairment. The most common cause is Alzheimer’s disease. A neurologic evaluation is needed to determine the cause of dementia so that the most appropriate treatment can be provided.
Q: What is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer’s disease?
A: Dementia is a general term for a group of memory disorders that can cause loss of memory, thinking abilities, language, problem-solving, and judgment skills. Alzheimer's is a specific medical disease and also a type of dementia.
Q: What is Alzheimer’s?
A: There is no cure for Alzheimer's disease, but it can be managed with proper care.
Q: What is typically the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease?
A: The first sign of Alzheimer’s disease is typically mild forgetfulness. A person may have trouble remembering recent events or take longer than before to finish a task.
Q: What changes in the brain happen to people with Alzheimer’s disease?
A: Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that leads to memory loss and cognitive decline. It is caused by the buildup of abnormal proteins in the brain, which leads to the death of nerve cells.
Q: What is dementia?
A: Dementia is a loss of thinking, remembering, and reasoning skills that interferes with a person’s daily life and activities. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia among older people. Other causes of dementia include blood-vessel disease in the brain (called vascular dementia), Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, and Lewy body disease.
Q: What is a leaky blood-brain barrier?
A: The blood-brain barrier is a protective barrier that separates the brain from the bloodstream. When this barrier is damaged, it’s called a leaky brain.
Q: What is Alzheimer’s disease and how does it differ from dementia?
A: Dementia is a general term for diseases that cause the gradual loss of ability to think, communicate, and live independently.
Q: What is a placebo?
A: A placebo is an inactive pill, liquid or powder that has no treatment value.

ALZHEIMER'S: PROGRESSION, TREATMENT, AND EARLY-ONSET EXPLANATION.

Q: What is Alzheimer's?
A: The exact cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown, but researchers believe it may be related to abnormal deposits of proteins in the brain.
Q: How does Alzheimer's usually progress?
A: Alzheimer's disease typically progresses slowly, beginning in a pre-symptomatic stage and advancing through several stages.
Q: How is Alzheimer's treated?
A: There is no prevention, cure or approved disease-modifying intervention for Alzheimer’s disease.
Q: What is early-onset Alzheimer's?
A: Early-onset Alzheimer's disease is when people under the age of 65 are diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

WHAT ARE THE

Q: What are other types of dementia besides Alzheimer’s disease?
A: Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia, but there are several other types as well. Vascular dementia is one of these other types, and it can sometimes occur after a stroke or brain injury. Symptoms of vascular dementia can include changes in thinking, memory, and behavior.
Q: What are the Early Symptoms of Alzheimer’s?
A: The early symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease can include memory lapses, impaired thinking, speaking, reasoning, spatial issues, and judgement.
Q: What are the Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease?
A: 1. Preclinical stage

2. Early stage

3. Middle stage

4. Late stage
Q: What are the stages in the development of Alzheimer’s disease?
A: Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disease that causes cognitive decline and eventually leads to total care.
Q: What are the different types of clinical trials?
A: Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people.
Q: What are the phases of clinical trials?
A: Clinical trials are conducted in phases.

DOES THE ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH ASSOCIATION

Q: What is the function of the Alzheimer’s Research Association?
A: We are a non-profit that helps caregivers of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.
Q: What kinds of products and services does the Alzheimer’s Research Association offer?
A: The Alzheimer's Research Association offers easy-to-read E-books to help give you some of the most important information on handling the disease and the problems that it presents. The Association also has a complete store on-site for any and all products that would make the lives of caregivers, patients, and seniors in general easier.
Q: What else does the Alzheimer’s Research Association do to help caregivers?
A: The Alzheimer's Research Association has gathered information on products and services that can help caregivers and patients of Alzheimer's disease. They have looked at the problems and found some of the best solutions by doing extensive research for the best the marketplace has to offer.
Q: How is the safety of the participant protected?
A: Clinical trials are regulated by ethical and legal codes to protect participants, and an IRB reviews the clinical research plan to make sure people in the research study will be treated fairly and that any risks will be explained to them.

IMPORTANCE OF TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

Q: What is translational research and why is it an important part of Alzheimer’s disease research?
A: Translational research is important because it allows knowledge from the laboratory to be applied as quickly as possible to new clinical tests or interventions.
Q: What is basic research and why is it an important part of Alzheimer’s disease research?
A: Basic biomedical research helps scientists understand how and why Alzheimer's disease starts and progresses. This research is essential for developing therapies to fight the disease.
Q: What kind of research do we do?
A: We don't do research to find a cure, but we do research to help caregivers more effectively support their Alzheimer's patients.
Q: Why is inflammation in the brain important?
A: Neuroinflammation is caused by microglia, which are the most common cells in our brains.
Q: What type of long-term follow-up care is part of this study?
A: The experimental treatment being tested may be effective because it has been tested before and hospitalization may be required. However, reimbursement for other expenses is unclear. Results of the trials may be provided to the participant.

DIAGNOSED AND ITS IMPACT IN THE US?.

Q: How is Alzheimer’s Diagnosed?
A: There is no one definitive test for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease, but doctors can use a combination of physical exams, neuropsychological tests, and brain scanning to confirm the diagnosis with 90 percent accuracy.
Q: How long do people live after getting diagnosed with Alzheimer’s?
A: The time from diagnosis of Alzheimer’s to the end of life varies. Life expectancy with Alzheimer’s can be as little as three years if the person is over 80 years old when diagnosed, or as long as ten years—or even longer—if the person is younger than 80 when diagnosed.
Q: How is Alzheimer’s disease diagnosed?
A: There is no definitive way to diagnose Alzheimer's disease while a person is alive. The only way to definitively diagnose Alzheimer's disease is to find out whether there are plaques and tangles in brain tissue, which can only be done after a person dies.
Q: How many people in the United States have Alzheimer’s disease?
A: Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative disease that affects the brain and nervous system. It is the most common form of dementia, and symptoms usually begin after age 60.

ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE?.

Q: What causes Alzheimer’s disease?
A: The underlying cause of Alzheimer’s disease is not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to the loss of neurons and the accumulation of abnormal proteins in the brain.
Q: What causes Alzheimer’s?
A: There is no single cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Instead, it is likely that a combination of genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors contribute to the development of the disease.

DETECT AND REVERSE ALZHEIMER'S AND COGNITIVE DECLINE?.

Q: What is mild cognitive impairment?
A: Mild cognitive impairment is a condition in which people have more memory problems than normal for their age, but their symptoms are not as severe as in Alzheimer’s disease.
Q: How do you detect Alzheimer’s before it’s too late?
A: 1. Get a brain scan.
2. Take cognitive tests.
Q: How do you reverse Alzheimer’s Disease and Cognitive Decline?
A: The Carroll Institute's Signature Programs page discusses our proprietary application of the Bredesen Protocol to see how we have created a step-by-step method of mentoring people through Alzheimer's reversal.

UNDERSTANDING CLINICAL TRIALS: QUALIFICATION AND PARTICIPATION.

Q: How do I know if I qualify for a clinical trial?
A: Alzheimer's disease is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain that is characterized by memory loss, difficulty with cognitive tasks, and eventual loss of all brain function. Early signs of Alzheimer's disease include memory problems and changes in mood or behavior.
Q: What is clinical research?
A: Clinical research is a health-related research study in human beings that follows a pre-defined plan.
Q: What is a clinical trial?
A: A clinical trial is a research study that follows a pre-defined protocol.
Q: Why participate in a clinical trial?
A: Clinical trials are important, and you should consider participating in one if you are eligible.
Q: What happens when a person signs up for a clinical trial?
A: If someone is interested in participating in a clinical trial at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, her/his name will be added to our list of interested potential participants.
Q: Who can participate in a clinical trial?
A: Clinical trials have guidelines about who can participate. The factors that allow someone to participate in a clinical trial are called inclusion criteria and those that disallow someone from participating are called exclusion criteria.
Q: What happens during a trial?
A: Clinical trials are research studies in which new treatments – drugs, diagnostics, devices, and other therapies – are tested in people to see if they are safe and effective.

CRITERIA FOR CLINICAL TRIALS FOR

Q: What are some common inclusion criteria for clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease at UCSF?
A: .
Q: What are some common exclusion criteria for clinical trials for AD at UCSF?
A: There are many reasons why someone might not be eligible for an Alzheimer's clinical trial, including not being stable on Alzheimer's medications, having another condition that could impact the results of the trial, or not being able to undergo an MRI scan.
Q: Who pays for research?
A: The organization that is sponsoring the clinical research study pays for the study.
Q: Where do the ideas for trials come from?
A: Clinical trials are ideas that come from researchers who want to test new therapies or procedures in the laboratory and in animal studies.

TRIAL?.

Q: What should people consider before participating in a clinical trial?
A: The biggest benefit of participating in a clinical trial is the regular contact with the study team. These visits provide an opportunity to get state-of-the-art AD care and also to talk on an ongoing basis with experts in AD who have lots of practical experience and a broad perspective on the disease.
Q: What are the benefits and risks of participating in a clinical trial?
A: 1. Gain access to new, potentially life-saving treatments
2. Help advance medical knowledge
3. Receive expert medical care at no cost
Q: What should people consider before participating in a trial?
A: 1. What is the purpose of the clinical trial?
2. Who is sponsoring the clinical trial?
3. Who has reviewed and approved the clinical trial?
4. How long will the clinical trial last?
5. What are the risks and benefits of participating in the clinical trial?
6. What are the side effects of the treatment being tested in the clinical trial?
7. What are the possible outcomes of the clinical trial?
8. What are the costs

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