Foodandwaterwatch.org / Consumer confidence



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unaffordable for more than a third of households
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communities across the country
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federal commitment
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baltimore s water affordability crisis
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baltimore s conundrum charging for water wastewater services that community residents cannot afford pay
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download report
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after one year of trump here are five big fights we can win in 2018
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The State of Public Water in the United States | Food & Water Watch
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/insight/state-public-water-united-states
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https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/ 10.160.50.04-1no-1-1-1-111
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/one-third-baltimore-residents-cant-afford-ever-incr 10.160.560.04-1no-1-1-1-111
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/insight/veolia-environnement 10.150.650.02-1no-1-1-1-111
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/sites/default/files/baltimore_water_shutoff_analysis.pdf 10.180.560.01-1--1-1-1-100
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/insight/baltimore-water-crisis-bad-everyone 10.180.860.01-1no-1-1-1-100
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/files/baltimore-water-shutoff-analysis 10.180.560.01-1--1-1-1-100
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/solution/research-policy-analysis 10.180.660.01-1no-1-1-1-100
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/problems/corporate-control-water 10.180.8700.69yes86280000
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/after-grassroots-campaign-atlantic-city-water-syste 10.180.870-1no-1-1-1-100
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/about/careers 10.180.870-1no-1-1-1-100

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https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/problems/corporate-control-water 170.180.870.60.69yes86280000
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/insight/state-public-water-united-states 90.210.820.50.8yes78170022
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/campaign/public-water-all 80.160.840.09-1no-1-1-1-100
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/insight/water-privatization-facts-and-figures 50.160.810.1-1no-1-1-1-100
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/ 50.160.50.01-1no-1-1-1-111
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/one-third-baltimore-residents-cant-afford-ever-incr 40.160.560.03-1no-1-1-1-111
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/insight/baltimore-needs-income-based-water-service-billi 30.220.650.07-1no-1-1-1-111
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/insight/baltimore-water-crisis-bad-everyone 20.180.860.01-1no-1-1-1-100
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/solution/research-policy-analysis 20.180.660-1no-1-1-1-100
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/insight/veolia-environnement 10.150.650-1no-1-1-1-111

Random 'consumer confidence FAQs', may be related to more specific topics, not general consumer confidence topic.

CONSUMER CONFIDENCE FAQs

CR OBTAIN RELIABILITY INFORMATION?.

Q: How Does CR Get Its Reliability Information?
A: Consumer Reports obtains its reliability data from the Auto Surveys sent to Consumer Reports members each year. In all, we received responses on over 300,000 vehicles in our 2022 surveys, detailing 2000 to 2022 models and some early 2023s.
Q: How Does the Reliability Rating Impact Recommendations?
A: The Consumer Reports Overall Score is a combination of the predicted reliability rating, the road-test score, crash safety, crash-avoidance technologies, and owner satisfaction.
Q: How does NRF define retail sales?
A: NRF's forecast for retail sales in 2023 is between 4% and 6% growth over 2022, with online and other non-store sales increasing by 10% to 12%. This growth is due to continued consumer confidence and disposable income, as well as the continued shift to multichannel sales.
Q: How will the new Rule impact my water rates?
A: The new Lead and Copper Rule may impact water rates in communities with many lead service lines, as the costs to replace those service lines may exceed what was originally budgeted. Water utilities may need to seek out additional funding or financing sources to minimize the impact on water rates.

POWER LINE SAFETY AND STORM PREPAREDNESS GUIDE.

Q: Who do I call if I have city power and there’s a power outage or my streetlights go out?
A: If you are a customer of city electric and your power goes out, call 614-645-7627. If you notice a streetlight out, call 311.
Q: What do I do if a power line comes down during a storm or because of an accident?
A: Don't touch a fallen power line.
Q: What should I do if a power line comes down on my car?
A: If a power line falls on your car, stay inside the car and wait for the electric utility to remove the wire.
Q: What do I do if there is lightning in the area during a storm?
A: There are a number of simple things you can do to avoid injury because of lightning: do not stand under a tree, do not stand in a flat place, do not ride a bicycle, do not fly kites or model planes, stay away from water and do not use the telephone.
Q: What do I do if I am experiencing low pressure?
A: Check your meter and the surrounding area for possible leaks. Next, call our office and report low pressure for your area.

LEAD IN DRINKING WATER?.

Q: What Types of Problems Are Reflected?
A: No, not all automotive problems are included in Consumer Reports' reliability surveys. The surveys cover 17 different trouble areas, but do not currently include active driver assistance systems or airbags.
Q: How can I be exposed to lead in drinking water?
A: Lead could be present in drinking water in property that has lead sources in household plumbing or in the water service line that connects the water main in the street to the property. Specific examples of household plumbing sources of lead in tap water are described here. The major concern for exposure is swallowing lead-contaminated water, whether as drinking water, other beverages prepared with water, food cooked with water, or rinsing after brushing teeth. Powdered infant formula should be prepared with bottled
Q: What are the health impacts of being exposed to lead?
A: Lead exposure can have many health impacts, the greatest of which is damage to the developing brain. Other significant health impacts include damage to blood cells, the kidneys, and the cardiovascular system.
Q: What are the health impacts of being exposed to lead in drinking water?
A: There is no safe level of lead exposure for human health. Children are particularly vulnerable to the adverse health effects of lead. Lead can be taken up into the blood from drinking water, and it can damage sensitive tissues in the body. Some of the health effects from drinking water highly contaminated with lead are anemia, hypertension, renal impairment, and toxicity to the reproductive organs.
Q: What populations (age groups) are at highest risk for lead exposure from lead in drinking water?
A: Pregnant women, fetuses, and young children are at highest risk for lead exposure from drinking water.
Q: What are the sources of lead in drinking water?
A: Lead is present in common plumbing materials. Any time lead is in contact with drinking water, there is a risk that lead can dissolve into the drinking water.
Q: What alternative sources of water are available if I am concerned about lead in my drinking water?
A: POU filters are very effective for reducing lead in drinking water. Look for point-of-use filters that meet NSF/ANSI Standard 53 for the reduction of lead and NSF/ANSI Standard 42 for particulate removal.

BLOOD LEAD TESTING AND RESPONSE FOR CHILDREN.

Q: Why should I choose Columbus Power?
A: City power is a good choice for your electric service because it is reliable and affordable.
Q: Who gets street lighting?
A: Some neighborhoods in Columbus still do not have street lighting, but the city is working to change that. Most of the areas where future lighting will be installed are chosen after input from people living in neighborhoods. The lighting program is multi-faceted, with voter-approved bond funds paying for basic lighting and special tax assessments funding more decorative lighting. After 1990, developers were required to pay for lighting installations in new developments.
Q: When should I get my child's blood lead level tested?
A: The AAP recommends that parents consult with a pediatrician about potential sources of lead exposure in the child’s environment beginning at six months of age. If there is reason for concern for lead exposure, the parents should consult with a pediatrician or their local health department earlier. If a risk for lead exposure is found, such as living in a home constructed before 1978, then the pediatrician may recommend that the child’s blood be tested for lead.
Q: Who should I contact to have my child’s blood tested for lead?
A: Children can be tested for lead by their pediatrician or local health department. Many public health clinics offer free blood lead testing of children.
Q: What do I do if my child tests high for lead?
A: If a child has a high blood lead level, the first step is to remove the sources of lead so that there is no further exposure. Local public health offices can assist families with understanding risks and options for children with elevated blood lead levels and identifying lead hazards in the home.
Q: What does MPMWC stand for?
A: MPMWC stands for Mil Potrero Mutual Water Company.

WHAT DO

Q: What Do the Different CR Reliability Ratings Mean?
A: Consumer Reports uses the data from its member surveys to compile detailed reliability histories on several hundred makes and models of cars, minivans, pickups, and sport-utility vehicles, covering the 2000 to 2022 model years and some early 2023s.
Q: What do results of blood lead testing mean?
A: There is no safe blood level of lead.
Q: What do different levels of lead in drinking water mean?
A: The EPA's lead action level of 15 ppb is not a measure of public health protection.
Q: Who can help with reducing water lead levels in my house?
A: You should consult with a licensed plumber to identify the materials in your home plumbing system and replace them with approved materials. All household drinking water pipes, fittings, and fixtures should use materials that are certified to meet NSF/ANSI 61 standards.
Q: Why does flushing sometimes lower lead levels?
A: Lead enters drinking water when it comes in contact with service lines or internal plumbing made with lead. The more time water has been sitting in your home’s pipes, the more lead it may contain. If you have not used your water for several hours, flushing your pipes may reduce the amount of soluble (dissolved) lead in your drinking water.

LEAD SERVICE LINE FAQS.

Q: What is a “consensus standard”?
A: A safety standard is a set of product requirements intended for manufacturers and importers to help reduce or prevent injuries. These requirements are usually met by passing specific performance tests. Voluntary safety standards are developed to reduce or eliminate injuries or deaths associated with products, ensure product parts fit together, and many more benefits.
Q: What are the health benefits of lead service line replacement?
A: Lead service line replacement can reduce the risk of lead exposure, which can improve health outcomes for children and adults.
Q: What is a lead service line?
A: The Michigan Lead and Copper Rule requires water supplies to replace all lead service lines and galvanized steel service lines if the galvanized service line is or was connected to lead pipe.
Q: What is an asset management program, and how do communities use it to replace lead service lines?
A: There is no one-size-fits-all answer to the question of water infrastructure asset management, as the specific needs of each community will vary depending on local conditions. However, some key elements of an effective asset management strategy for water infrastructure include identifying and prioritizing critical assets, developing a long-term financial plan for sustaining those assets, and establishing clear lines of responsibility and communication for their upkeep.
Q: Why is it important to get my entire lead service line replaced?
A: Lead service line replacement removes the largest source of lead affecting drinking water in homes and buildings, and reduces the risk of lead exposure.
Q: What will happen at my house when my lead service line is replaced?
A: The main steps in replacing a lead service line are: 1) identifying the location of the lead service line, 2) getting a signed agreement to replace the line if necessary, 3) inspecting where the water service enters the house, 4) completing the service line replacement, and 5) providing instructions about proper flushing of the home’s plumbing after the work is finished.
Q: How much will lead service line replacement cost?
A: The cost to replace a lead service line (LSL) depends on whether the line is being replaced in coordination with water main or road resurfacing projects. When coordinated, the costs can be as low as $1,000 - $3,600 per line. If replaced outside of the context of other projects, costs range from $6,500 - $8,000 per LSL or more.
Q: How do I report a street light is in need of repair that is not located at Blacklake Golf Course?
A: The most common cause for a sewage smell in your home is a leak in your plumbing. You should check your toilets, water heater, and sprinkler system for leaks. If you can't find the source of the leak, you may need to call a plumber.
Q: Where is the most recent Consumer Confidence Report CCR?
A: The water is safe to drink.

IN MY COMMUNITY AND MY RIGHTS.

Q: How can I find out how many lead service lines are in my community?
A: If the inventory information for your water supply is not published in either of the two required places, you should call your water supply to ask for a copy and contact the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) to ensure they enforce this requirement.
Q: How is my municipality prioritizing whose lead service lines are being replaced first?
A: The Michigan Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) requires water suppliers to replace lead service lines (LSLs) at a rate of 5-7% per year, but it does not mandate the order in which the LSLs are replaced.
Q: How do I find out if my community has a lead action level exceedance?
A: If the number in the "Lead 90th Percentile (ppb)" column is greater than 15 ppb (16 ppb or larger), that means your community has a lead action level exceedance.
Q: Where can I find the Rules, Regulations and Rates regarding my rights as a shareholder/customer?
A: The rules are there to make sure everyone is on the same page and to keep the community functioning smoothly. If you have any questions about the rules, feel free to reach out to a member of the Board of Directors.
Q: How can I remove information about myself from Google's search results?
A: Google will remove results from its search engine if the individual requests it and if the results are deemed inadequate, irrelevant, no longer relevant, or excessive.

LEAD SERVICE AND EXCESSIVE WATER BILL INQUIRIES.

Q: How do I participate?
A: You can help develop standards for consumer products by joining a standards development organization and participating in the discussion and drafting of new requirements.
Q: How do I know if I have a lead service line?
A: 1. Look at your water bill
2. Call your local water utility
3. Have a professional plumber inspect your home's piping
Q: Why do some homes have high lead results and others low, when they both have lead service lines?
A: There are three major reasons why lead compliance samples from different homes with with lead service lines may have very different results:

1. Different lead service lines may have different levels of lead contamination.

2. Different homes may have different levels of lead contamination in their water due to other sources, such as lead pipes or fixtures.

3. Different homes may have different levels of lead contamination in their water due to different water quality or treatment.
Q: How could I have used this much water?
A: Call the office, we'll help you out.
Q: Why do I have a previous balance when I know I sent in my payment?
A: If you think you may have not received your refund, call our office and we will help you solve the problem.
Q: What if I felt I have an excessive water bill?
A: There are a few things you can do to check for leaks:

-Verify your payments are going to the proper agency
-Check for leaks – Sometimes this can be verified by watching your meter turn when you think all water is turned off in the residence

COMPLYING WITH MICHIGAN’S LEAD AND COPPER RULE.

Q: Why does my certificate indicate less credit than I anticipated?
A: Please contact our Customer Service team at 212-339-0345 for questions about registering or pricing for an event, group discounts, or billing. For media inquiries, please email Allison Nilsen (allison.nilsen@tcb.org). For sponsorship inquiries, please email david.turchetti@tcb.org.
Q: What does the Lead and Copper Rule require my water supplier to do to reduce my exposure to lead in my drinking water?
A: Water supplies in Michigan have to take several steps to reduce the amount of lead in drinking water, including lead compliance sampling, corrosion control treatment, lead service line replacement, and public education campaigns.
Q: What does our water supply need to communicate to customers to be in compliance with the Michigan LCR?
A: version:

The water supply must provide customers with information about the Lead and Copper Rule, including how to get their water tested and what to do if lead levels are high.
Q: What is my water supplier required to do if my home has elevated lead in the water?
A: If you collected water samples for compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) through your water supplier, your water supplier is required to notify you within 30 days of receiving the sample results.
Q: How are water utilities (and water main replacements) typically funded?
A: A water utility is primarily funded by the rates paid by the water customers connected to that system. Ratepayer funds are used for ongoing operations of the utility as well as longer-term projects like water main replacements. Grants or low interest loans are also available to some communities.
Q: Why does the new Michigan Lead and Copper Rule require water supplies to replace the entire lead service line at the water supply’s expense?
A: Replacing the entire lead service line (LSL) is the most effective way to reduce exposure to lead in drinking water. Replacing only a portion of the LSL can actually increase the risk of exposure.
Q: Why is my water discolored?
A: The milky look is probably due to a repair that allowed air to enter the line.
Q: What chemicals does our utility district add to the water?
A: The only chemicals that are approved by the National Safety Foundation for treatment of drinking water are chlorine, chloramine, and chlorine dioxide.
Q: What about the water from my refrigerator water dispenser/ice maker?
A: No, the ice maker in your fridge is not a source of lead in your drinking water.
Q: How do I submit my final reading?
A: If you're moving out and need to submit a final reading, you can do so by clicking here.

POINT-OF-ENTRY (POE) AND POINT-OF-USE (POU) TREATMENT SYSTEMS.

Q: What is point-of-use (POU) treatment?
A: Point-of-use treatment is an effective way to treat lead in drinking water when lead is present in service lines and/or plumbing.
Q: What is point-of-entry (POE) treatment?
A: POE systems can be effective for reducing contaminants from the water entering the home, but they are not as reliable as POU devices for lead reduction because there are multiple potential sources of lead in household plumbing.
Q: When should I consider point-of-use (POU) treatment or filtration?
A: If you have lead in your water, you should use filtered or treated water for drinking, cooking, or preparing formula.
Q: How do I use a point-of-use (POU) or point-of-entry (POE) treatment system?
A: You should always follow the manufacturer's instructions when installing or using any water treatment system. You will need to replace the filter cartridge on a schedule as instructed by the manufacturer.

UNDERSTANDING MICHIGAN LEAD AND COPPER RULE CHANGES.

Q: Why make a voluntary standard instead of making a regulation?
A: Voluntary standards can typically be made faster than federal rules, and the CPSC is legally required to give preference to an existing voluntary standard if it is determined to be adequate to address the risk of injury associated with a product and the industry substantially complies with the standard.
Q: Who is responsible for implementing and enforcing the provisions of the revised Michigan Lead and Copper Rule?
A: The new Michigan Lead and Copper Rule creates more stringent requirements to reduce the risk of exposure to lead and copper in drinking water. Municipalities and water supplies are responsible for implementing the new requirements. The EPA has granted the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality/Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy the authority to enforce the revised rule.
Q: How are lead and copper compliance samples collected under the new Michigan Lead and Copper Rule?
A: Samples are collected after at least 6 hours of no water use in the building being sampled. Samples are collected from a tap regularly used for drinking water, typically the kitchen or bathroom faucet. In homes with lead service lines, the first liter and the fifth liter out of the tap will be collected, each in a 1 liter sample bottle. The first liter represents water from household fixtures, and the fifth liter is more likely to represent water from the lead service line. Only
Q: Who pays to replace lead service lines that run under private property?
A: The revised Michigan Lead and Copper Rule requires water supplies to replace the entire service line, including the portion that runs under private property, at the water supply’s expense. This requirement may conflict with Michigan’s Constitution, which states that public funds may only be used for “public purposes.” A lawsuit that includes this issue was filed in late 2018. The outcome may help to clarify this issue.
Q: How was replacement of lead service lines handled prior to the revision of the Michigan Lead and Copper Rule?
A: The new Michigan Lead and Copper Rule requires water suppliers to replace all lead service lines by a set deadline, and bans partial lead service line replacements.

ICANN COMMISSION AND CONDUCT THESE SURVEYS?.

Q: Why did ICANN commission this survey?
A: The IAG-CCT concluded that a global survey of Internet users should be conducted to measure how the New gTLD Program has impacted competition, consumer choice and consumer trust in the domain name space. ICANN has commissioned a survey to do just that.

What is the IAG-CCT?

The Implementation Advisory Group on Competition, Consumer Choice and Consumer Trust (IAG-CCT) was a group of experts that was formed by ICANN in 2013.
Q: When did this survey take place?
A: The survey asked respondents about the current state of the Rust community and their experiences with Rust. We asked about their experiences with Rust tooling and learning Rust. We also asked about how they found out about Rust, their use of Rust, and their satisfaction with Rust.

There were 1,843 responses to the survey.

Demographics

The survey was taken by 1,843 people.

The vast majority of respondents are male (88.5%). Most
Q: When did these surveys take place?
A: The wave 1 and wave 2 consumer surveys were conducted online between February 2 and 19, 2015, and April 12 to May 2, 2016, respectively. The wave 1 registrant survey was conducted between 19 February and 15 May 2015, and the wave 2 registrant survey was conducted between June 20 to July 11, 2016.

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION DATE & CCT-RT SURVEY DETAILS.

Q: What year was the building constructed?
A: If you have a building built before 1986, it is likely to have a lead service line.
Q: How will the CCT-RT use the survey in its analysis?
A: The CCT-RT is conducting a survey of the Canadian cannabis community to learn about their needs and wants.
Q: Who was surveyed?
A: Nielsen conducted two online surveys of Internet users ages 18 and older from 24 countries. In phase 1, 6,144 adults were surveyed, and in phase 2, 5,452 adults and 600 teens were surveyed. The results were reported at a 95% confidence level.
Q: What was the format of the survey?
A: they asked a bunch of questions about the game and what people thought.

The survey was sent to over 20,000 people who have participated in the beta test, and they received over 2,000 responses.

The survey results are now available, and you can check them out here.

Some of the highlights include:

- People are really enjoying the game, with an average score of 8.4/10.

- The most popular game mode is Conquest
Q: Where can I learn more about the work of the CCT Review Team?
A: The CCT Review Team is a group of people who are looking at the Code for Canada Training program and making recommendations on how to improve it. They have a wiki with lots of information and resources, and they have recently posted videos of their leaders discussing the Review Team's work.
Q: Why does debris come out of the faucet when running hot water?
A: Your water heater needs to be flushed.

HOW WERE

Q: When were the faucets installed?
A: If the building is pre-1978, there is a chance that it may contain lead pipes. The building management should have a plan to mitigate the risk of lead poisoning.
Q: How were terms defined?
A: The Generic Domains Division of ICANN's Generic Domains Department (GDD) is conducting a study to understand how people understand and use generic domain names.

The study consists of an online survey that will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. The survey is open to all individuals aged 18 years or older.

The survey will close on 30 September 2019.
Q: How were new gTLDs picked for inclusion as responses to survey questions?
A: The study found that new gTLDs are becoming more popular, with the percentage of global internet users who have heard of new gTLDs increasing from 58% in 2015 to 68% in 2018.

The study also found that new gTLDs are becoming more trusted, with the percentage of global internet users who trust new gTLDs increasing from 34% in 2015 to 41% in 2018.

The study also found that new gTLDs are

CITY'S ELECTRIC DIVISION, CORROSION CONTROL, WATER ASSESSMENT.

Q: Why does the city own an electric division?
A: No, the city electric utility is not a bad deal for the city. It is actually a very good deal for the city, and has been for over a century.
Q: What is corrosion control, and why do we use it for drinking water?
A: Corrosion in pipes can lead to the release of metals, including lead and copper, into drinking water. Corrosion control treatment typically means adding a chemical at the water treatment plant to reduce pipe deterioration. Effective corrosion control limits corrosion in pipes and can reduce lead release into drinking water. However, corrosion control does not eliminate all of the risk of exposure to lead in drinking water.
Q: Why do we pay an assessment into the water company?
A: Each parcel in the water company holds a water share, and each owner is a shareholder in the water company. The annual assessment pays for the operation of the company, including maintenance of wells, pumps, and tanks, treatment of water, and transmission and distribution of water.

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