Oregongeology.org / Landslide



Domain overview in Landslide niche. Based on relevant links and pages only.
oregongeology.org rank
76
Number of domains linking to oregongeology.org
11
semantic flow
0.75
Number of links to oregongeology.org
16
semantic flow
0.75
Number of domains linked from oregongeology.org
54
semantic flow
6.95
Number of links from oregongeology.org
173
semantic flow
6.95

Popular pages pointing to oregongeology.org

Pages with highest topical PageRank pointing to domain.

url / atext / target url
http://www.oregongeology.org/lidar/
metadata
http://www.oregongeology.org/lidar/metadata/Oregon_Digital_Bare_Earth_Slope_Imagery_Mosaic
http://www.oregongeology.org/lidar/
lidar data distribution policy
http://www.oregongeology.org/lidar/DOGAMI_Lidar_Data_Distribution_Policy_20170411.pdf

Popular pages from oregongeology.org

On-topic pages from domain with highest topical PageRank.

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DOGAMI - IMS-30 Oregon City quadrangle landslide inventory maps
http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/ims/p-ims-030.htm
0.281200000
DOGAMI - SP-45, Protocol for Shallow-Landslide Susceptibility Mapping
http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/sp/p-SP-45.htm
0.281310000
DOGAMI - Open-File Report O-17-04, Landslide inventory of portions of northwest Douglas County, Oregon
http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/ofr/p-O-17-04.htm
0.281700000
Learn more about Oregon Geology - Sunstones
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/learnmore/Sunstones1.HTM
0.210.6314102100
DOGAMI - Open-File Report O-16-02, Landslide susceptibility overview map of Oregon, by William J. Burns, Katherine A. Mickelson, and Ian P.
http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/ofr/p-O-16-02.htm
0.211720000

Domains with most semantic flow to oregongeology.org

Relevant domains with most links to selected domain.

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http://nanoos.org/ 40.2nanoos.org
http://pnsn.org/ 20.14pnsn.org
http://crew.org/ 20.13crew.org
http://wsspc.org/ 10.07wsspc.org
http://cccarto.com/ 10.07cccarto.com
http://wa.gov/ 10.04wa.gov
http://usgs.gov/ 10.04usgs.gov
http://opb.org/ 10.04opb.org
http://pdxmonthly.com/ 10.03pdxmonthly.com
http://buffalo.edu/ 10buffalo.edu

Domains with most semantic flow from oregongeology.org

Relevant domains with most links from selected domain.

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http://usgs.gov/ 441.95usgs.gov
http://oregon.gov/ 271.24oregon.gov
http://redcross.org/ 70.31redcross.org
http://weather.gov/ 80.28weather.gov
http://fema.gov/ 80.26fema.gov
http://oregonexplorer.info/ 30.24oregonexplorer.info
http://pnsn.org/ 40.23pnsn.org
http://youtube.com/ 50.2youtube.com
http://arcgis.com/ 50.17arcgis.com
http://oregonmetro.gov/ 20.12oregonmetro.gov

Most linked pages from oregongeology.org

Pages from domain with most relevant inbound links.

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http://www.oregongeology.org/ 20.290.950.11-1no-1-1-1-111
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/publications/IMS/ims.htm 10.180.940.071yes71241111
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/Landslide/Landslidehome.htm 10.150.950.071yes28276211
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/disclaimer.htm 10.160.840.061yes10102200
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/data.htm 10.160.870.061yes29123300
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/background.htm 10.160.840.061yes16112200
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/help.htm 10.160.840.061yes1072200
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/feedback.htm 10.160.840.061yes11102200
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/resources.htm 10.160.790.061yes20195300
http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/ofr/p-O-12-05.htm 10.1710.041yes310011

Hubs from oregongeology.org

Pages from domain with most likely on-topic outgoing links.

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http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/nr/p-nr.htm 1320.160.975.61yes2821575500
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/earthquakes/earthquakehome.htm 380.160.962.191yes625017900
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/publications/IMS/ims.htm 230.180.941.751yes71241111
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/Landslide/Landslidehome.htm 170.150.951.121yes28276211
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/ 100.1510.61yes10103300
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/resources.htm 30.160.790.181yes20195300
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/help.htm 20.160.840.121yes1072200
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/data.htm 20.160.870.111yes29123300
http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/ofr/p-O-12-05.htm 10.1710.091yes310011
http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/slido/background.htm 10.160.840.031yes16112200

Random 'landslide FAQs', may be related to more specific topics, not general landslide topic.

LANDSLIDE FAQs

UNDERSTANDING LANDSLIDES AND STAYING SAFE.

Q: What are landslides?
A: Landslides are natural processes that lower and flatten the topography.
Q: How can we prevent landslides?
A: Landslides can be caused by a variety of factors, including rainfall, earthquakes, and volcanoes. They can be devastating to both people and property, and often result in loss of life. Although we can’t necessarily prevent landslides from occurring, there are mitigations steps we can take to protect our homes and property.
Q: How dangerous are these phenomena?
A: Landslides and debris flows are both dangerous and can cause extensive damage. However, landslides tend to occur over a longer period of time, while debris flows are much quicker and can take people by surprise.
Q: What are the requirements for someone under 18 to attend?
A: No outside food or drink (including alcohol) is allowed into the venue, but you can bring food and water into the campgrounds. You can bring your own tent for camping, and RV/camper/bus is allowed but no fee is required. There is a refund policy for tickets.

LANDSLIDES IN NEW ZEALAND?.

Q: What causes landslides in New Zealand?
A: Intense rainstorms, large earthquakes, weak rock, steep slopes, and deforestation are the most common causes of landslides in New Zealand.
Q: What is New Zealand's biggest landslide?
A: The Green Lake landslide in Fiordland is thought to be the most significant catastrophic landslide in New Zealand.
Q: What causes a landslide?
A: Landslides can be caused by a combination of different factors, both manmade and geological.
Q: When is landslide season?
A: There’s no definitive answer to this question because landslides can occur at any time of the year. However, the most common time of the year for landslides is during episodes of heavy rainfall and winter.
Q: Why Landslide Printing?
A: We make custom apparel faster and cheaper than anyone else.

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VOLCANOES, EARTHQUAKES, AND PREDICTIVE SOFTWARE.

Q: What can researchers simulate and predict using software such as RAMMS?
A: There is no sure way to predict when a natural hazard will occur, but there are some warning signs that can help you avoid being caught in one.
Q: What is the relationship between volcanoes and earthquakes?
A:
Q: What it is the difference between magnitudes ML and mN?
A: No, people cannot cause earthquakes.

WHERE CAN I FIND

Q: Where do landslides occur?
A: The states most susceptible to landslides are those that experience large amounts of precipitation and have harsh climates. These include California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and Hawaii.
Q: What does difference in conditions insurance cover?
A: DIC insurance is a type of property insurance that covers perils that are excluded from standard property coverage.
Q: Where do earthquakes occur in Canada?
A: There are many earthquake detection networks around the world, and earthquakes occur at a relatively constant rate. The largest earthquake in recent history was the 1960 Chilean earthquake, which had a magnitude of 9.5 and caused the death of more than 2000 people. In Canada, the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) records and locates over 4000 earthquakes each year, and of these, only about 50 are generally felt.
Q: Where can I find information on Canadian earthquakes?
A: The largest earthquake recorded in Canada was a magnitude 8.1 event that struck just off the Haida Gwaii on Canada's west coast on August 22, 1949.
Q: Where can I find seismic hazard maps for Canada?
A: Seismologists at the Geological Survey of Canada produce seismic hazard maps for use in the National Building Code of Canada.

DURING NATURAL DISASTERS?.

Q: What do seismic waves look like?
A: There are no active faults in the east or north of Canada, so the probability of an earthquake is not increased. However, it is possible to build your own seismograph.
Q: What should you do during an earthquake?
A: The safest type of structure is a modern, well-designed, and well-constructed building. However, even these structures are prone to damage from soil failure, chimneys may be damaged or collapse, windows may break, interior walls may crack, and those houses not securely bolted to their foundation may fail at or near ground level.
Q: What should you do after a strong earthquake?
A: Be prepared for an earthquake by having a plan and supplies ready. When an earthquake happens, stay calm and follow instructions from authorities. Be aware of the risk of tsunamis after an earthquake and evacuate to higher ground if necessary.
Q: What do scientists do after an earthquake?
A: Earthquakes can cause damage to buildings, but modern buildings are designed to withstand them. Seismologists study earthquakes to better understand them and their effects.

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